Home | Site Map | Advertise With Us | Contact Us | Link With Us | Increase Website Traffic

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Water, Water Everywhere on the Waterfront!

Waterfront living is among the most desirable of locations in our area. The views and vistas are fantastic, not to mention the ability to walk out ones door to drop a line to fish or untie a line to enjoy boating. However, all this joy is not without some special concerns.

The most common fear heard from waterfront homebuyers is their concern that the river can rise and roll into their home. While it is not an impossible scenario, it is truly rare. More almost always than not, the water that posses the greatest risk to the waterfront home is not from the river, but rather from the water flowing overland toward the river.

Always remember that the river is the place that all water flows to. How a particular home is oriented to or obstructs the flow of water moving toward the river determines how dry the house remains. And for many homes in is not just how dry it is in the home, but also under the home.

The majority of water that affects the home is the surface water flowing toward the river. The volume of water could be in the thousands of gallons per hour during a heavy shower. If the grade of the lot is not proper, this may mean thousands of gallons of water in or under the home.

So, when looking at waterfront property, enjoy the view over the water, but be sure to look inland to be sure that your experience with water front living wont be with water in the living room!

But what should you do after youve experienced a flooded home? There is hope! Your home and its contents may look damaged beyond repair, but many items can be restored. There is a high probability that by acting quickly, your flooded home could be cleaned up, dried out, rebuilt, and reoccupied more quickly than you think.

After your home has been flooded, play it safe. Always seek professional help. And while in the midst of cleaning and repairing, consider your preparation for the future. The American Red Cross and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) suggests the following steps if your home has been flooded:

Take Care of Yourself First - Protect yourself and your family from stress, fatigue, and health hazards that follow a flood.
Give Your Home First Aid - Once it is safe to go back in, protect your home and contents from further damage.
Get Organized - Some things are not assessment of worth repairing and some things can be too complicated or expensive for you to do by yourself. A recovery plan might take these things into account and help you build the most of your time and money.
Dry Out Your Home - Floodwaters damage materials, leave mud, silt and unknown contaminants, and promote the growth of mildew. You need to dry your home to reduce these hazards and the damage they cause.
Restore the Utilities - The rest of your work will be much easier if you have heat, electricity, clean water, and sewage disposal.
Clean Up - The walls, floors, closets, shelves, contents and any other flooded parts of your home should be thoroughly washed and disinfected.
Check on Financial Assistance - Voluntary agencies, businesses, insurance, and government disaster programs can help you through recovery.
Rebuild and Flood-proof - Take your time to rebuild correctly and build improvements that will protect your building from damage by the next flood.
Prepare for the Next Flood - Protect yourself from the next flood with flood insurance, a flood response plan, and community flood protection programs. This step also includes sources to go to for additional assistance.
For more understanding on repairing your home after a flood, please visit www.redcross.org.

Many all the people highly prize waterfront living, and find it a deeply fulfilling knowledge. Knowing what to look for when choosing waterfront property will make your life on the water easier and more rewarding. Choose and plan wisely - its about knowing!
 

 
Three Lessons Katrina Should Have Taught Us
Three Lessons Katrina Should Have Taught Us By Jared N. Sorensen I have listened with a certain degree of sad amusement to all the political and media hoopla about what went wrong with the Hurricane Katrina disaster response. Fingers are pointed...Full Article
Are You Ready for an Emergency?
Hurricane Katrina, closely followed by hurricane Rita, should have taught us all a workable lesson or two about the value of being prepared. For one thing it is not wise to think that someone else, especially Big Brother, will bail you out, ...Full Article
Business Continuity Testing
Disaster Recovery is not Business Continuity. Many businesses do not have full business continuity plans. They say they do have business continuity plans but they really mean that they have a disaster recovery plan, usually meaning that they ha...Full Article
Why our Nations Communications System Needs Urgent Overhaul To Prevent More Unthinkable Disasters
Much of the chaos in New Orleans could have been avoided if police, fire and emergency personnel had been able to communicate with their command centers and with each other. Failure to communicate turned a natural disaster into an unthinkable disas...Full Article
The BOOZE SNOOZE (Alcohol Abuse)
Dangers of the booze snooze Drink driving not a very great combination kill or be killed. Think before you drink? You might be saving your own life by saying no to last orders or that of a friend who you feel might have had too much to drink...Full Article
How to Find the Right Charities to Help Hurricane Katrina Victims?
How Can I Help The Victims Of Hurricane Katrina? This question rises today in the minds of many Americans, trying to help millions of everybody who are suffering from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina and desperately positive need water, foo...Full Article

 

 

 

 

Home | Site Map | Advertise With Us | Contact Us | Link With Us | Increase Website Traffic

Copyrightę All rights reserved